Activities

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Historical Buildings

Location: Richard Street, Bourke, NSW 2840

Catholic Church (Sister of Mercy Convent) 

Catholic Church, St Ignatius.
This is Bourke's oldest documented building and was opened the first Sunday after Easter in 1874.

 

NSW Department of Lands website hompage

National Parks

Mount Gunderbooka rises to 500 m among the rust-coloured cliffs, gorges and hills of the Gunderbooka Range. The region is of great significance to the local Ngemba people and the range has a history of ceremonial gatherings and rock art.

The Currawinya National Park located in the outback of Queensland is home to a large wetland area with 2 lakes at it heart. The Numalla and Wyara are semi permanent lakes with a wide variety of bird life.

This park was created in October 2002. It covers an area of 30,604 hectares.

This park was created in November 2010. It covers an area of 30,866 hectares.

Villages Surrounding Bourke

 

Louth Darling River: 'a place that loved a drink, a party and a punt..' So wrote Henry Lawson about Louth. Louth is a small service town (Pub, fuel and general store) on the Darling River about 100km downstream from Bourke and 100km upstream from Tilpa.

Tiny border town made famous by Henry Lawson's short story. 'One of the hungriest cleared roads in New South Wales runs to within a couple of miles of Hungerford, and stops there; then you strike through the scrub to the town.

Tiny village near the Queensland border Located 100 km north of Bourke and only 40 km from the Queensland border, Enngonia is one of those towns which has seen better days.

 

Sign your name on the bar wall at Tilpa's famous Royal Hotel, a real bush pub on the banks if the Darling River. A hundred years old and made of corrugated iron and timber, it's full of outback character - and characters, too.

 

Sleepy little township with a pleasant pub No one really knows how Byrock got its name and the theories which abound are almost certainly more interesting than the real origins. One school of thought argues that one of the early local residents, a family which had a holding of 1600 acres, was named Bye. Thus when referring to the nearby rock hole people spoke of Bye's Rockhole.

On the banks on the Paroo River, 240 kilometres to the east of Tibooburra, and 195 kilometres north west of the Darling River township of Bourke, is the village of Wanaaring. Established in the 1880's, the town provided services to the large sheep properties of the time. Once, wool scouring, or wool washing, was carried out on the banks of the river. Long gone, reminders of those times can be found amongst the memorabilia on the river banks.

Sleepy little township with a pleasant pub No one really knows how Byrock got its name and the theories which abound are almost certainly more interesting than the real origins. One school of thought argues that one of the early local residents, a family which had a holding of 1600 acres, was named Bye. Thus when referring to the nearby rock hole people spoke of Bye's Rockhole.

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